GEPHE SUMMARY
Gephebase Gene
Entry Status
Published
GepheID
GP00000232
Main curator
Martin
PHENOTYPIC CHANGE
Trait Category
Trait State in Taxon A
Drosophila melanogaster
Trait State in Taxon B
Drosophila melanogaster
Ancestral State
Data not curated
Taxonomic Status
Taxon A
Common Name
fruit fly
Synonyms
Sophophora melanogaster; fruit fly; Drosophila melanogaster Meigen, 1830; Sophophora melanogaster (Meigen, 1830); Drosophila melangaster
Rank
species
Lineage
Show more ... Brachycera; Muscomorpha; Eremoneura; Cyclorrhapha; Schizophora; Acalyptratae; Ephydroidea; Drosophilidae; Drosophilinae; Drosophilini; Drosophila; Sophophora; melanogaster group; melanogaster subgroup
NCBI Taxonomy ID
is Taxon A an Infraspecies?
No
Taxon B
Common Name
fruit fly
Synonyms
Sophophora melanogaster; fruit fly; Drosophila melanogaster Meigen, 1830; Sophophora melanogaster (Meigen, 1830); Drosophila melangaster
Rank
species
Lineage
Show more ... Brachycera; Muscomorpha; Eremoneura; Cyclorrhapha; Schizophora; Acalyptratae; Ephydroidea; Drosophilidae; Drosophilinae; Drosophilini; Drosophila; Sophophora; melanogaster group; melanogaster subgroup
NCBI Taxonomy ID
is Taxon B an Infraspecies?
No
GENOTYPIC CHANGE
Presumptive Null
Molecular Type
Aberration Type
Molecular Details of the Mutation
Promoter variation
Experimental Evidence
Authors
Mackay TF; Lyman RF
Abstract
Numbers of Drosophila sensory bristles present an ideal model system to elucidate the genetic basis of variation for quantitative traits. Here, we review recent evidence that the genetic architecture of variation for bristle numbers is surprisingly complex. A substantial fraction of the Drosophila genome affects bristle number, indicating pervasive pleiotropy of genes that affect quantitative traits. Further, a large number of loci, often with sex- and environment-specific effects that are also conditional on background genotype, affect natural variation in bristle number. Despite this complexity, an understanding of the molecular basis of natural variation in bristle number is emerging from linkage disequilibrium mapping studies of individual candidate genes that affect the development of sensory bristles. We show that there is naturally segregating genetic variance for environmental plasticity of abdominal and sternopleural bristle number. For abdominal bristle number this variance can be attributed in part to an abnormal abdomen-like phenotype that resembles the phenotype of mutants defective in catecholamine biosynthesis. Dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) encodes the enzyme that catalyses the final step in the synthesis of dopamine, a major Drosophila catecholamine and neurotransmitter. We found that molecular polymorphisms at Ddc are indeed associated with variation in environmental plasticity of abdominal bristle number.
Additional References
COMMENTS
@GxE
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